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Fluouride. helps teeth but not in our Drinking water please! cover

Fluouride. helps teeth but not in our Drinking water please!

The Dangers of Fluoride in Drinking Water

Did you know that the fluoride in your drinking water may be doing more harm than good? While fluoride has been added to public drinking water supplies for decades in an effort to improve dental health, new research suggests that it may be having the opposite effect.

Let's take a closer look at the dangers of fluoride in drinking water.

Fluoride is a chemical that can be found naturally in water supplies, but it can also be added artificially. When fluoride is added to water, it forms a type of film on the teeth that is believed to help prevent tooth decay. However, recent studies have suggested that this film may actually be harmful to teeth, and that the fluoride in drinking water may be contributing to an increase in cavities and other dental problems.

Natural fluorite

One of the most concerning things about fluoride is that it's difficult for the body to remove it once it's been ingested. This means that it can build up in the body over time and potentially cause health problems. Becasue of this, it is one of a family of what erin Brokovitch labelled ‘Forever Chemicals’.

Some of the potential health risks associated with fluoride exposure include:

Dental Fluorosis:

This is a condition that causes the teeth to become mottled and discolored. It's most commonly seen in children who have been exposed to high levels of fluoride during their formative years.

Skeletal fluorosis:

This is a condition that leads to the hardening and weakening of the bones. It can be caused by prolonged exposure to fluoride.

Kidney damage: Fluoride can accumulate in the kidneys and lead to kidney damage over time.

Cancer: Some studies have suggested that there may be a link between fluoride exposure and certain types of cancer, though more research is needed.

As you can see, there are a number of potential dangers associated with fluoride exposure. If you're concerned about the fluoride in your drinking water, there are a few things you can do to reduce your exposure.

Use a water filter: A water filter can help to remove fluoride from your drinking water.

Drink bottled water: If you're unsure about the quality of your tap water, opt for bottled water instead. (Not out of plastic bottles, and check the label for fluoride!

Avoid processed foods: Many processed foods contain fluoridated water, so avoiding them can help to reduce your exposure.

While more research is needed to fully understand the risks associated with fluoride exposure, it's clear that there are potential dangers that should be taken seriously. If you're concerned about the fluoride in your drinking water, take steps to reduce your exposure and talk to your dentist about other ways to protect your dental health.

Fluoride is a naturally-occurring mineral that is found in many water sources, including underground aquifers, rivers, and lakes. It can also be found in some soil. While small amounts of fluoride are not harmful, too much fluoride can lead to a condition known as fluorosis, which can damage the enamel of teeth and cause other health problems.

Fluorosis occurs when someone is exposed to too much fluoride over a long period of time. This can happen if someone drinks water that contains high levels of fluoride or if they use products that contain fluoride, such as toothpaste or mouthwash. Children are especially vulnerable to fluorosis because their teeth are still developing.

While mild cases of fluorosis may only cause white spots on teeth, more severe cases can lead to brown stains, pitting, and even crumbling teeth. In extreme cases, fluorosis can even lead to skeletal problems. Studies have also linked exposure to fluoride to an increased risk of bone cancer and other health problems.

Conclusion:

While the addition of fluoride to public drinking water supplies was originally intended to improve dental health, new research suggests that it may actually be doing more harm than good. Too much fluoride can lead to a condition known as fluorosis, which can damage teeth and cause other health problems. If you're concerned about your exposure to fluoride, consider using a home filtration system to remove it from your drinking water. You should also avoid using products that contain fluoride, such as toothpaste or mouthwash.

Resources:

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/fluoride-in-drinking-water
https://www.webmd.com/oral-health/fluoride-myths-and-facts#1